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Gazelle Gazette

The "Gazelle Gazette" is a Carder Steuben Club Newsletter that is initially delivered as an email and is maintained by Alan Shovers. This section provides an archive of the Gazelle Gazette Newsletter postings. If you would like to submit a Newsletter posting or have your email address added to Alan's address list, please email it to Alan Shovers.


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Carder Steuben Candlestick - 6384




Guilloche

Posting Number 2904   Date: 03/05/18     Return to Posting List

About a week ago we pictured an exhibit from the Reifschlager Gallery at the Rockwell Museum featuring late 1920s decorated Blue and Gold Aurene with related markings on the picture of of leaf and vine decoration. Two (the two on the right) of the pictures decoration is not leaf and vine, but Guilloche.

from Wikipedia

Guilloché (/ajÈloŠƒ/),(or guilloche) is a decorative technique in which a very precise, intricate and repetitive pattern is mechanically engraved into an underlying material via engine turning, which uses a machine of the same name, also called a rose engine lathe. This mechanical technique improved on more time-consuming designs achieved by hand and allowed for greater delicacy, precision, and closeness of line, as well as greater speed.

The term "guilloche" is also used more generally for repetitive architectural patterns of intersecting or overlapping spirals or other shapes, as used in the Ancient Near East, classical Greece and Rome and neo-classical architecture, and Early Medieval interlace decoration in Anglo-Saxon artand elsewhere. Medieval Cosmatesque stone inlay designs with two ribbons winding around a series of regular central points are very often called guilloche. These central points are often blank, but may contain a figure, such as a rose.[1] These senses are a back-formation from the engraving guilloché, so called because the architectural motifs resemble the designs produced by later guilloché techniques.


Images:
Click to view image one: Rockwell461.jpg
Click to view image two: Guilloche1.jpg
Click to view image three: Guilloche2.jpg

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